Dr Katherine Brown.

Dr Brown is a Reader in Islamic Studies at the University of Birmingham.   

She holds a PhD in comparative politics of the Islamisation of Muslim women's rights in the UK.  An overview of her credentials are offered below:

Education:

  • 2000: BA (Hons) Politics and International Relations, First Class, Lancaster University

  • 2001: MSc International Relations (Research), University of Southampton. ESRC Funded

  • 2005: PhD, "Muslim Women’s Rights in Egypt, Malaysia and UK”, University of Southampton, Dr Tony Evans (Supervisor), Dr Jill Stean (External Examiner). ESRC Funded

  • 2011: Post-graduate Certificate in Higher Education (PGCAP), King’s College London

  • 2015: MA Academic Practice, Distinction, King’s College London


 

Publications:

  • (2018) Gendered Violence in the making of the proto-state Islamic State. Book Chapter in Parashar, S. (ed) Gendered States. OUP. Chapter 11.

  • (2017) and Elizabeth Pearson “The Online-world, Social Media and Terrorism” in Andrew Silke (ed.), Handbook of Terrorism and Counter-terrorism (Routledge).

  • (2016) “Securitization of Human Rights” in Steans, J. and Tepe-Belfrage, D (eds.), Handbook on Gender and World Politics (Edward-Elgar). Chapter 30. Pp.255-262.

  • (2016) and Silke, A. ‘‘Radicalisation’: The Transformation of Modern Understanding of Terrorist Origins, Psychology and Motivation.’ In S. Jayakumar (ed.), State, Society, and National Security: Challenges and Opportunities in the 21st Century (World Scientific Publishing) Chapter 9.

  • (2015) “Marginality as a Feminist Research Method in Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism” In Critical Methods in Terrorism Studies. Dixit, P and Stump, J. L. (Eds.). (Routledge). pp.136-149

  • (2015) and Tania Saeed, “Radicalization and Counter-Radicalization at British Universities: Encounters and Alternatives” Journal of Ethnic and Racial Studies 38(11) pp.1952-1968

  • (2014) “Influencing Political Islam: Moderation, Resilience and De-Radicalization in UK domestic Counter-Terrorism policies (2005-2011)” in Tuck, C. and Kennedy G. (Eds.) British Propaganda and Wars of Empire: Influencing Friend and Foe 1900-2010 (Ashgate).

  • (2014) “Gender and Religion” Chapter 25, in Laura Shepherd (ed.) Gender and Global Politics Second Edition (Routledge).

  • (2013) and Mustafa, D. and Tillotson, M. “Antipode to Terror: Spaces of Performative Politics” Antipode. 45(5) pp 1110–1127

  • (2012) with Syme-Taylor, V. “Gender and Feminism in Professional Military Education” Equality, Diversity and Inclusion 31:5/6 pp. 452 – 466.

  • (2012) “Gender and Anti-Radicalisation: women and emerging counter-terrorism measures” in Satterthwaite, M. and Huckerby, J. (Eds.) Gender, National Security and Counter-terrorism: a human rights perspectives(Routledge), pp. 36-59.

  • (2011) “Muriel Degauque: Media Representations of Europe's First Female Suicide Bomber,” European Journal of Cultural Studies 14:6, pp. 705-726.

  • (2011) “Blinded by the Explosion? Security and Resistance in Muslim Women’s Suicide Terrorism,” in Sjoberg, L. and Gentry, C. (Eds.) Women in Global Terrorism (University of Georgia Press), pp.194-226.

  • (2011) “Terror in the Faculty Lounge: Addressing the Politics of Fear and the Politics of Difference in Government Security Policies,” in Geary, A. and Diamantides, M. (Eds.) Islam, Law and Identity (Routledge-Cavendish), pp. 236-262.(2010) and D. Mustafa “The Taliban, Public Space, and Terror in Pakistan” Eurasian Geography and Economics, 51: 4, pp. 496–512.

  • (2010) “Contesting the Securitization of British Muslims: Citizenship and Resistance,” Interventions: International Journal of Post-Colonial Studies 12:2, pp. 171-182.

  • (2010) and Daanish Mustafa“The Taliban, public space, and terror in Pakistan” Eurasian Geography and Economics. 51, 4, p. 496-512

  • (2008) “The Promise and Perils of Women's Participation in UK Mosques: The Impact of Securitisation Agendas on Identity, Gender and Community,” British Journal of Politics and IR 10:3, pp. 472-491.

  • (2006) “Realising Muslim Women's Rights: The Role of Islamic Identity among British Muslim Women,” Women's Studies International Forum 29:4, pp. 417-430. 

Digital Scholarship: