Volume 9: They Plot & Allah Plots

This volume opens with an offensive against the crusaders who Da’esh claim have contempt within their hearts for Islam and how this is evident through the 'idol' of free speech.  They refer to the Texas ‘draw Muhammad competition’ as an example of this contempt; an event that was disrupted by two of Da’esh’s supporters for whom Da’esh claim martyrdom.  Da’esh continue to highlight issues with other jihadi operatives in the area, the Shamiyyah front, Jawlani front, PLO, Faylaq ash-Sham and the sahwah fighters whom they argue have been supported by Iran.  In this volume Da’esh supports its practice of enslavement and suggest that it is a sunnah of the prophet Muhammad that they have reinstated.  In fact, they argue that many individuals, of their own free will, accept Islam after being enslaved.  Da’esh pays some attention to the spiritual development of its supporters within this volume and outlines a roadmap for shahadah (martyrdom) which begins with hijrah and ends with shahadah. 

Most interestingly, Da’esh argue that conspiracy theories are shirk (polytheism).  They suggest that the conceptualisation of certain events (for example 9/11) as something that has been orchestrated by international governments forcibly invalidates the attribute of God as being the ‘all mighty’.  Rather it places such a designation in the hands of mortal (and in this case) infidel organisations which, in Da’esh’s legislation, is apostasy and shirk.  Thus jihad should not be abandoned for fear of apostasy.  Da’esh details the healthcare programmes it offers within its wilayat, medical interventions that are provided by qualified medical staff.  They boast about the fact that they have both male and female teaching staff who are qualified within their respective disciplines.  Da’esh offers free education to its students.  In addition, they offer the stories of two notable individuals, Abu Musa al-Almani, a German soldier who enlisted to Da’esh and Hudhayfah al-Battawi, a dentist who became a Da’esh operative and was then incarcerated.  Al-Battawi led a rebellion in prison against his jailors and was killed as a result of it.  He was with a child who he never met.  Da’esh present this as the model exemplar of commitment to jihad; a benchmark of faith in which this world did not distract him from his religious duty.  In a similar fashion to other volumes Da’esh present an open call for supporters to make hijrah to the Islamic State or attack the non-Muslim context wherever they may be.  The title of this volume is a rebuttal to the notion that western powers plot to a degree that is greater than Allah’s ability to plan and prepare.